Ep#62 Mission: Leader in Cloud Solutions and Evangelism with Mr. Hunt (Randall Hunt)

May 2, 2022
EP62 Randall Hunt 1280

About the Guest

Caylent is Rocket Fuel for Cloud Native Adoption.

We are a 200+ strong cloud-native services company that helps organizations bring the best out of their people and technology using AWS.

We are obsessed with accelerating time-to-value and our track record is backed by years of experience working with customers to solve even the most complex challenges.

Episode Summary

Think Mission Impossible.... What does SpaceX, AWS, MongoDB, NASA or even Facebook have in common? Wait, I know there is a joke in there somewhere… or what’s the punchline? That’s right, our next guest has led software and developer relations teams at all of them and is highly experienced in the developer community. Joining us today is Randall Hunt, VP of Cloud Strategy and solutions at Caylent and developer experience.

Episode Show Notes & Transcript

Host: Jon

Morning, Mr. Meyer, your mission. Should you choose to accept it involves a podcast with Randall hunt to talk about SpaceX, AWS, Mongo, DB, NASA, and his new role at Caitlin. You have 48 hours to recruit Randall and meet online to record your assignment as always, should you or any member of your team be caught or force to sing baby shark. The secretary will. Disbel all knowledge of your actions and Mr. Meyer, the next time you plan to be outta summit, please be good enough to tell us this message will self destruct in five seconds.

Host: Jon

What does SpaceX MongoDB, AWS, NASA, or even Facebook have in common? Hmm, I'm sure there's a punchline in there somewhere. That's right. Our next guest has led software and developer relation teams at all them and is highly experienced in a developer community. Joining us today is Randall hunt, VP of cloud strategy and solutions at Caitlin and the developer experience. Before I bring Randall onto the show, don't forget to hit that light subscribe and notify. All right. It's time to ring Randall on. Please join me in welcoming Randall hunt in a podcast. Randall. Thanks for joining me.

Guest: Randall

It's awesome to be here on the John Meyer podcast. Thanks for having me.

Host: Jon

Yeah, I'm glad you had a few moments to join me for the show. I wanna talk about some of your experience, you know, going from like AWS to Caitlin. And in fact, let's talk about that right now. I believe you and I were at AWS right around the same time. What were you doing there?

Guest: Randall

We were indeed. So, uh, when I was at AWS, I had a couple different roles. I started out, uh, doing some software engineering. Uh, so my first time at AWS, you know, years and years ago, I, I was doing some software engineering and then I moved over into a developer advocacy role back then we called it technical evangelism. And you can kind of argue about the difference between the two, you know, one is bidirectional and one is kind of purely outbound, but really, you know, it was just a title. We, we did all the functions that you would expect in a developer relations team. And then from there I became, uh, solutions architect for a while. And I worked with the Amazon connect team. I work with a lot of the API and AI services over the years SageMaker and, uh, recognition and transcribe and translate and comprehend and all that good stuff. And, uh, then I, I left, uh, AWS. I went to Facebook for a while where I led the pie torch team, the open source side of that. And then, uh, I came to, you know, I did a couple startups and some random stuff. And then I arrived at Kalin. So, you know, weird stuff in between where I wasn't sure what I was doing. And then now I'm at Kalin, which is home.

Host: Jon

So we fast forward to Kalin. But before we get to what you're doing at Caitlin, let's talk about AWS. I believe you have an interesting story and we can't say her name. So we're just gonna use the word echo,

Guest: Randall

Right? So we'll say, we'll say echo instead of using the, uh, the term that invokes the things. Yes. So in case anybody's got their speakers on. So, okay. When my second time interviewing at Amazon, uh, echo had just come out really like it had just become popular. So I think, I think it originally came out in like 2014 or 2015, something like that, but it did, it had not reached a level of popularity until say 2016. So I was, uh, I was interviewing and I was coming back to AWS and, uh, there was this opportunity where you could build custom echo skills. Uh, and a lot of the meeting rooms at Amazon had echoes inside of them. So the, the problem with building these custom skills is that you could not include the word Amazon or Amazon web services, uh, because those were kind of reserved words.

Guest: Randall

So I just included it with a different spelling. And so then when I said at the, at the, in part of the interview process is you, you end up giving this large presentation to an audience and some people are in the room, some people are on chime or, or whatever. And I ended up saying at the end of the interview, uh, Hey, <laugh>, uh, Amazon, or, you know, echo ask Amazon if they should hire Randall hunt. And then it gave, you know, it triggered to Lambda function, which gave the response, uh, to everyone in the room. And it's like, absolutely, you should hire Randall hunt. And I just remember watching everyone in the interview being like, okay, well I have no further questions. <laugh>,

Host: Jon

That'll like silence the room. So did you bring your own echo or did you integrate, like, how did you get, okay, so you brought your own that already had it set up.

Guest: Randall

Yeah, not only did I bring my own, I actually published the skill, so it was able to be installed. Uh, and I got to the meeting room before anybody else. And the recruiter made the mistake of leaving me in that meeting room.

Host: Jon

So did you, oh, so you got it installed on that? Yeah. Right away. Oh, so I, oh,

Guest: Randall

I, I totally hacked that whole process. And so I, I, I brought my own is backup in case it didn't work, but the, the crazy thing was they stopped you from reserving words that had anything to do with Amazon, but they didn't look at the misspellings of the word. So I found if I put two A's in Amazon, it worked just fine.

Host: Jon

Oh, so you hacked the process and the skillset. Oh, man. Extremely hired on the spot.

Guest: Randall

<laugh> they? They have since patched these vulnerabilities so many years ago, this is like eight years ago now. So keep that in mind,

Host: Jon

Anybody listening to the show, if you're thinking about trying this out, I would like you to comment down below if you found other variations that worked. I think that will be one of the things I might have to try with mine. We can't say her name cuz on my desk and it triggers a bunch of stuff, but maybe you'll find out later what it does.

Guest: Randall

We'll see it

Host: Jon

Randall you well, before I get to Kailin you did a thing at, uh, what was it? SpaceX, uh, Mongo DB, uh, uh, apparently some well known in the Mongo DB community. You wanna share some of that?

Guest: Randall

Oh, I mean, I, I was, uh, a baby engineer back when I was a Mongo DB. So, so my, my background was I was studying, you know, physics and a little bit of computer science and I was doing mass properties and materials engineering at NASA as an intern. And then as like a full-time co-op kind of deal. Uh, and then I, I went back to the college after a year of working with NASA and I hated it. And I got in my car and I drove to New York and uh, I ended up meeting this guy named Elliot Horowitz at a hackathon in Elliot Horowitz was the co-founder of Mongo DB. And he was like, uh, well you should, you know, just come build cool stuff. So I did that. I went to MongoDB, had a great time, uh, in New York city, uh, saw that company grow from a, a very small number of people into an extremely large number of people in a very short period of time.

Guest: Randall

Uh, then I hopped to AWS for a year change. And, uh, right when I went to AWS, I also got this offer from SpaceX. Uh, and I, because I had already said yes to Amazon, I, I felt, I, I didn't think it was like appropriate to go and say to Amazon, oh, sorry, you, you know, I got a better offer talk to you later. Uh, so I, I stayed to Amazon for a year and then I got the SpaceX gig and I was like, okay, I I've gotta do this. I've gotta try it out. You know, this is exciting. Um, and SpaceX was awesome. It was, it was truly just one of the best experiences in my career. I, I, I got to work on the continuous integration and deployment of the rocket hardware and software stack. Um, got to sit in mission control a couple times. I was there when we landed the first rocket. And I was also there when we got kicked out of bars in El Segundo for violating fire code after we landed the first rocket, um, it turns out if it says maximum 45 people occupancy and you somehow have 200 people in the bar that the fire department gets called. Um, and then we tried to get the fire department to party with us and that really

Host: Jon

Well <laugh> that's right. Get 'em on your side by Dr. Drinking a little bit, give 'em some, a couple beers

Guest: Randall

<laugh> yeah. And, uh, yeah, I mean, MongoDB was great. That's I would really say that's where I got my chops as an engineer. I, I learned operations. I learned C plus plus I learned Python. I learned front end dev, uh, worked on the spider monkey JavaScript engine, worked on the pH JavaScript engine, uh, learned a lot about distributed architectures and kind of networking constraints and partitions and the way that things fail at scale. Uh, I think, I think Monu is probably one of the best places in the world to be at that time, because they were on the cutting edge of you, you know, these large scale distributed systems and serving real workloads. You know, they had this customer, I think it was Disney or, or Marvel comics or something that literally had a thousand, no cluster. And people just weren't really, you know, the number of people who were dealing with that at the time, you know, you, you had Facebook and you had, I don't know, five or six other companies back in 2011 that were really operating at that scale.

Guest: Randall

Um, and being able to see that and be a part of it was completely invaluable experience that I still kind of draw back on today. Uh, and then SpaceX, wasn't really so much the, about the scale of what you were building because the, the, the overall workloads, they weren't, you know, consumer facing, they were really just internal facing and building rockets and scaling rocket software. But, uh, it was a very cool opportunity to work with crossdisciplinary teams and learn how you can build interfaces and services that work not just well for engineers, but also well for your non non-software engineering counterparts.

Host: Jon

Okay. I'd love to be, I wanna say in mission control, but that bar scenario sounds very interesting to be kicked that right. <laugh>

Guest: Randall

Was pretty fun.

Host: Jon

Oh, I'm sure that's the experience. I'm sure there's some content flowing around about it. I might have to try to drum some up. Okay. You're at CALT now, how did you get to CALT? What are you doing there?

Guest: Randall

Well, um, I was at a startup, eh, prior to CALT and, uh, the, the issue with the startup was I, I was just brought on too early, cause it was brought on to do kind of a developer relations kind of role, but the startup just wasn't quite ready for developer relations. Uh, and I think the founders were doing a, a significant, uh, a good enough job of developer relations on their own. And I just, I, I didn't really feel that I was providing any value. So I, I wanted to kind of pop out and see what else was out there. Uh, I was actually planning on taking a pretty long time off. Uh, and then I went to reinvent. I went to Vegas and, uh, uh, a friend that I knew from, uh, a actually a podcast I was on years ago, mark McQuaid. Um, he told me to meet with this other person named Steven garden, who was, uh, the, the founder of this company called Anika.

Guest: Randall

And, uh, Steven was like, okay, well, you have to meet the CEO of, of CALT who's JP. And so I, I ended up meeting them at reinvent and then I did a little bit of back channeling and I called up some of the customers that I knew. And some of the people I knew that worked there and, uh, CALT has this unique ability to deliver, uh, a 9.7 CSAT score. So that's kind of unheard of in the professional services industry where you have, you know, customer satisfaction that high all the time. Uh, they have this really great space theme and branding. And I just, I, I met with a bunch of the people on the team and, uh, I was very impressed and I was just excited for them. And then I chatted with JP and I was like, how do I be a part of this?

Guest: Randall

Where do I fit in? Like, let let's, let's figure it out. And we did. And so now I, I work at Kalin and my kind of remit, my, my goals are to get us, uh, to premiere status with AWS, to get us more AWS competencies and to really just be, uh, a great place for people to work. You know, I'm sure as, you know, the, the talent industry, the, the talent right now, hiring is quite difficult and people move around a lot. So I don't expect people to stick with CA forever, but I do think that if you're a, uh, you know, early career developer, this can be a great place to just get your cloud programming chops, get your cloud native chops and, and learn how to go and, and do the things that you want to do. Uh, I think Farst Brazil. Um, he, he works at Google now, but he, he wrote this great blog post a couple years ago, about how everyone should work at consult in consulting at one point during their career.

Guest: Randall

Uh, and this is really my first time doing it. And, uh, I find the exposure to all the different customers is fantastic. You, you know, you, you end up learning about all these different industries and how things work, and it's very exciting to build applications for different customers and see the end result of that and see it real, you know, deployed in the real world in production, serving customers, uh, there's this one customer schedule that does vaccine appointments all over the world. Uh, these are workloads that really matter. And I think if you're a young engineer or an early career developer, that sort of thing, you want to be exposed to those workloads because as Verner vocals is pretty fond to saying, there's, there's no compression algorithm for experience, and this is a great place to get experience. And I, I, my part of my remit is making it an even better place to get experience and share that experience.

Host: Jon

I had the chance to work as a consultant early on in my career. And I think it provides you a different perspective on the unique architectures that are out there for various industries, going from like services and retail, to marketing, to finance, how you do things is completely different, but it provides you that experience. And I know you just quoted Warner rules, and that is, I knew you were gonna say that because there isn't anything to that experience. I do like your personality and what you're trying to do. And what Kaylin's trying to do is like, we, you're saying that we know you might not stick around, but we're gonna give you the best experience and you know what, you're ultimately probably gonna stick around, but we want to provide you that. So that's the way I don't wanna say an employer should be, but just that feeling, just that, you know, welcome this, that, you know, what you might not be here, but you're gonna enjoy it. And you'll probably be here for the long haul.

Guest: Randall

Yeah. And I, I really like the space branding and theme too. I, you know, we, we, we used to do, you know, project kickoff, but now with customers, I wanna rename the project kickoff to customer launch plan. And <laugh>, uh, we nice, you know, this, this bootcamp and training program. And I was like, it's gonna be the Kayley and cadets program, you know, and we're just gonna keep the space theme as much as we can. It's, it's a little gimmicky, but I, I still like it a lot. It's, it's fun. And, uh, you know, I think with, with junior talent coming out of different schools and different programs, there's, it's worthwhile to make an investment when someone joins the company and, you know, Hey, here's, here's get 1 0 1 here's, you know, editor set up 1 0 1, because you, you, you know, there, there are different personality types that are involved. Some people love to tinker with their environment and tinker with their tools, uh, sometimes to the detriment of actually getting work done. Uh, I am certainly one of those people, I will tinker with my environment in my tools all day long, um, and other people, they don't care, you know, they'll use notepad plus plus, and just write everything.

Host: Jon

Oh my God. That brings back memories. Okay. <laugh>

Guest: Randall

So, so I think having a couple of, uh, base courses about networking fundamentals, you know, Hey, a TCP pack, it's 20 bites, you know, how do you set the maximum transmission unit on a server? Like why, why does transit gateway have a smaller MTU than safety PC peering does just covering all of this stuff as part of the onboarding and, you know, having a discussion about it in small groups is great. And I, I love the idea too, of, you know, Kay's teaching Kans where, you know, there's an assignment, oh, we're gonna go off and learn about this for the week, and then we're gonna present it back to everybody. So we have this internal knowledge, uh, transfer kind of program where, uh, people will talk about engagements that they've done. They'll talk about, uh, tools that may not even be directly related to AWS if they've used and why they liked them or why they didn't like them. And, uh, it's a, it's just, it's, it's the most fun I've had in a job since, for as long as I can remember.

Host: Jon

KA Kaen cadets fundamentals, 1 0 1. <laugh> all right. There's your, there's your class title? I wanna talk, I wanna jump into a couple of things, cuz I know we have a list of items you wanted to talk about like cloud native developer and a developer experience. What are you talking about there? Like what cloud native developer is that somebody just, oh, I know how to do the cloud stuff or what is it about,

Guest: Randall

So there's this interesting kind of discussion with having that. I think people are avoiding, which is what is the AWS developer experience overall and how

Host: Jon

Does okay. Let's change the subject. No, I'm just kidding. Just kidding. You said avoiding. I was just like, well, let's avoid it. No, go ahead.

Guest: Randall

Uh, and, and how does it compare to other developer experiences? And it's very popular, you know, it's a popular meme to say, oh, the AWS console sucks. Uh, I think that's, you know, it's very easy to criticize, but why does it suck? And does it even suck? And, and in my opinion, it does not. I, I think the AWS console has had drastic improvements. Uh, I think the, the redesign is fantastic and they've made huge strides. So, you know, the, the old, the old AWS console from say 2012, you know, that's a discussion worth having, but as developers, we, we're very prone to adopting opinions based on initial assessment and initial evidence. But then we struggle sometimes to go back and update that understanding and update that opinion. So I, I, I hated chef for many, many years, uh, because of some, some version is versioning issues.

Guest: Randall

They did way back in, I don't know, 2012 or something. And it was like, oh, I'm never using chef again. I'm never using ox code again, but that understanding was outdated. And I, when I went back and I tried it all out and I, I learned, oh, chef has drastically improved. This is great. This, I can use this all the time now. So when we talk about cloud native developer experience, Azure, Microsoft, they own many of the touch points the developers deal with. And day in, day out, Microsoft owns GitHub. Microsoft owns vs code. They're the primary contributor to type script. Uh, they are, they own LinkedIn. So you, you have this kind of incentive from GitHub and from vs code pushing you towards Azure, but people aren't really using it. So why is that? And I think it's because the actual Azure developer experience is inferior to the AWS developer experience.

Guest: Randall

And, uh, I'm sure that'll get lots of people telling me, I don't know what the hell I'm talking about, but I do, you know, I've, I've worked across thousands of customers over the last decade in change. And, uh, you know, my opinion is informed by my experience and I'm quite in it. And, uh, if you disagree with me, uh, you're just wrong. No, no, I'm just, if you, if you, if you disagree with me, like I, I do, I would love to like hear and I would love to kind of hear the specifics. So, uh,

Host: Jon

Actually I do not disagree with you. I I'm on the same opinion set as you, but I use those same tools. Yes. But as you know, I use those tools, but I don't use Azure. I use AWS because I like the tools that were provided for Microsoft, for like visual code to access my AWS. It's just, it works. It's great. Yeah.

Guest: Randall

And I, I think that's fine too, is, is there can be multiple winners in this space, but I, when we, when we go all the way back to the original question was, you know, what is cloud native developer experience? I think we're at a crucial point in the evolution of cloud right now where originally developer experience is what brought people to the cloud. You know, it wasn't cost savings. It wasn't performance. It wasn't ease of use. It wasn't the, the mix, it was purely developer experience. A developer did not want to wait for an operational team or a colo to go and provision a server for them. They wanted to spend something up, post a workload and get to work. That's what really got the cloud started. Now, of course, myriad other things input into that and became a positive flywheel and positive cycle, all this other good stuff.

Guest: Randall

But we're at the point now where cloud has seen significant adoption, there are multiple competitors in this workspace. And I think we are at a point where the differentiator is going to come back to developer experience. And that's why I think it behooves AWS to invest significantly in improving developer experience across the board, because you can't just be good and you can't just be better. You have to be exceptional and you have to maintain that high standard moving forward. And if they, if, if first of all, if AWS doesn't do it and someone else does, then hopefully all of the other cloud providers are gonna rise to that standard. But I do wanna see us as an industry start improving our developer experience across the board.

Host: Jon

I agree with you. And you were talking about, uh, the AWS console. I don't have a problem with it. I mean, I use it. I, I go into it. Yeah. It's grown to like, what 210 plus services right around there from the original, you know, like 10. So obviously things are gonna change a little bit, but, uh, I've tried using other cloud providers and I didn't like the blades, the slide outs. And I didn't understand it. Wasn't very intuitive to me as a person, but that's just my choice. I liked AWS console. It's just a better experience for me.

Guest: Randall

Yeah. And I, and that's why when I see criticisms that are not specific of the AWS console, I'm always, is this in, is this an opinion informed by experience or is it just the popular meme right now? Is it the zeitgeist? And I, you see it all the time on hacker news, isn't on Reddit and stuff like that. And I, I'm just, I'm pretty tired of it. So I've started kind of chirping back and you know, this a hockey term chirping back, but you know, I've started, I've started kind of chirping back and saying, well, well, why do you think that, you know why what's wrong?

Host: Jon

Exactly. Provide a little bit more data around it. So Randall, I wanna talk about something, I guess you're passionate about, we were talking about off offline is the AI ML and the custom Silicon. Let's let's talk about that.

Guest: Randall

Yeah. Okay. So I, I had a con, I was in New York, uh, last night and I had a conversation about this, uh, with some healthcare startups who are using, uh, AI and ML. And, uh, there's, there's this, the, the, the ubiquity of, of deep learning is not really here yet. You know, we, we use it every day. You know, if you use a phone, you are, um, using deep learning. You know, if you, if you have an apple iPhone, and you go and, um, search for the word cat in photos, that's a local model running on the phone. That's determining in tagging all the photos for you. Pardon me? Just one moment.

Guest: Randall

Sorry. Um, so deep learning is in a lot of places, but it's not fully democratized. It's not as easily accessible. And it's really because, uh, training these real world production models can be quite expensive, uh, especially at scale, you know, you can, you can do it kind of piecemeal on individual developer laptops or, or small workstations. But, uh, AWS has said something for a few years, which is very interesting, which is the cost isn't so much in the training. The cost is in the inference. And I've seen that born out in the customer workloads that we've done, uh, inference ends up being the most expensive part. And what's very interesting. Now is Silicon the hardware on which we run our compute is differentiating very quickly. Invidia is releasing new chips, arm, new chips, apple, new chips, uh, you know, even, even Microsoft has their own chips.

Guest: Randall

Now, uh, Google has their TPUs. This custom Silicon is fantastic and super, super powerful. However, the software is not yet at the point where you can take advantage of it. So take a SageMaker Neo, for instance, this is the, um, this is the compiler built into AWS SageMaker that supposedly will, uh, compile your jobs for the specific hardware platform you were targeting. And they also have something now called the SageMaker training compiler. Neither of these things is capable of fully targeting the wide set of hardware that AWS offers. Um, they, they can do a, a halfway decent job of it, but to truly take advantage of custom Silicon, right now, you end up having to write custom code and you end up having to, you know, do custom translations. And this is an area that is ripe for disruption. I think if someone can find a way, uh, and, and I think pie torch does a particularly good job of this, but if someone can find it an even better way than what pie torch is doing of abstracting the underlying hardware and saying, I want to take advantage of the best possible operations that in hardware that this can happen on, you know, so it is a training compiler.

Guest: Randall

It is a, an IML compiler, but it is intelligent enough to be able to rewrite models and rewrite, uh, code to take advantage of that underlying hardware. If someone can get that done, uh, you know, like I think we're gonna see pretty dramatic improvements. And, and I mean, if you just think about AWS infrastructure as a whole, there's, there's been drastic improvements across the board over the last few years. And I, I expect them to continue.

Host: Jon

Isn't this something similar to what they've done with graviton?

Guest: Randall

Well, on the graviton side, that custom Silicon is, was not originally directly targeted at, uh, IML workloads, uh, for what it's worth. There are certain IML workloads that will perform exceptionally well on graviton. Uh, but there are other kinds of operations, you know, that don't perform as well as because X 86, you know, you have this, uh, AVX two instruction set, which are these large, you know, five, 12 by five, 12, or even larger, uh, matrix operations that you can apply at a hardware level. Um, and then there are like vectorized math libraries that you can use, like, uh, slip C or, um, you know, that's, that's probably way too deep, but, you know, there's, there's all of this cool stuff that you can do in X 86 that, uh, arm still has a lot of this capability, but not all of the compilers that are out there take advantage of these capabilities.

Guest: Randall

So you end up running code that is com you know, it supports arm is a compiled target, but it doesn't actually use any of the underlying hardware. So that's one of the things with writing for, uh, max or writing for apple hardware is, is difficult because you have to leverage, um, you know, core ML or some of these other frameworks to really take advantage of these M one max scores and things like that. But going back to graviton you, you know, it's originally based on a acquisition, uh, that AWS made from Anna Perna labs back in a long time ago. Now,

Host: Jon

I think it was 2015 think 20 15, 20 15 or 2018, no, 2018 was, uh, graviton was released. So 2015 I think, or somewhere right around there. I, I have to check my notes. I literally just did a course on it. No lie

Guest: Randall

<laugh> oh, yeah. And I mean, we've, we, we worked with a couple customers recently where we reported their, these is not an IL workload, just regular, uh, compute workload over to graviton. Uh, they got a 60% cost savings. Um, yep. And then the spot market for graviton is excellent right now, too. I, so I don't know when this podcast will come out, but the, at the time of

Host: Jon

<laugh> disclaimer, disclaimer, <laugh>

Guest: Randall

At the time of recording the spot market for RDS, uh, or sorry for, um, graviton instances is exceptional. I mean, we we've realized huge savings for our customers leveraging

Host: Jon

That. Nice. Gravitons a graviton three obviously released in a reinvent 20, 21 that I'm sure there's gonna be in, you know, this year in reinvent, there's gonna be some new additions. I'm not predicting graviton four I'm and predicting increase, or some enhancements of graviton three or some customizations are built on. There's always something new and happening. In fact, with all the summits that are happening this year, which is great, the in person stuff, there's gonna be more releases in my per my prediction. Yeah. My opinion is my own. <laugh>

Guest: Randall

Typically the big releases happen at SF in New York. Mm-hmm <affirmative>, I, I love to see a little bit more love spread around, you know, I I'd like releases pepper throughout the year, which of course a abs does, but, uh, SF in New York summits tend to have the big releases. Also one, one point about graviton three is that it is actually in preview and very few people have access to it. So, um,

Host: Jon

Yep.

Guest: Randall

The reasoning, this is my uninformed, no insider knowledge kind of thing. Uh, if you think about how long it takes to do, uh, the Foundry process for Silicon, the bring up and all of this, um, Lisa, Lisa Sue from AMD has a great article on what, what that process is. But if you think about how long that takes, uh, <laugh>, you end up, you end up, uh, spending 90% of the time waiting for robots to get reconfigured for the Silicon lab, bring up and then printing it all out. And then you, you know, even if the chip is already designed, it may not see the light of day for two years. So the fact that AWS releases graviton two, you know, two short years ago and graviton three in 2021, uh, yeah, that's, that's extremely impressive. And I think I now understand why it's in preview because how the heck are they printing these out and getting them shipped everywhere? And I, I think they're probably a little behind on that. That's my guess.

Host: Jon

I know they just released an instance for that. What letter was the C seven G or something, uh, that was just released. So it's all in private preview. Maybe by the time this podcast makes out it will be public. Who

Guest: Randall

Knows? Yeah. I hopefully it'll go GA at the SFF summit. That'd be good. I I'd like that.

Host: Jon

Well, I'll tell you why. So Randall, will you be at SF or New York? I'll,

Guest: Randall

I'll be at both. Yes.

Host: Jon

Same here. Looking forward to seeing you there Randall, before we wrap things up, what are some of those open roles at Caitlin that you're looking to fulfill? And I will include a link because this won't go out probably for another three to four weeks, so I can include a LinkedIn to some of those roles,

Guest: Randall

Right? So we're hiring across the board right now. I would say, uh, we have a cloud security team that is growing very quickly and we have a lot of customer interest there. So if cloud security is of interest to you, we have a number of open roles there. We also have an open role, uh, or a series of open roles right now in, uh, CSAs. So these are kind of customer solutions, architects or customers, you know, success, architects. We, we want folks who, uh, may not necessarily be hands on keyboard day in, day out, writing architectures and writing code. Uh, and, but they are able to deal with architecture and deal with, uh, you know, defining a statement of work for a customer. So there, there're also a number of other open roles across, you know, HR and finance and marketing and just a ton of other cool things that we're working on. So if, if anything that I've said today interests you. If, if there's anything that you would like to do, please come join us. It's a lot of fun over here. And we're a fully globally remote company that, uh, you know, just has a good time.

Host: Jon

And if anything else, take a look at the website for the cool space and quirkiness, because I liked it. And I think it just flows right up where you were with SpaceX. I mean, like, I think it attracted you. It was like, oh, space X. Oh, Kayla. Oh, I like this. I'm yeah, sign me up.

Guest: Randall

I, I do like the space theme. Not

Host: Jon

Gonna, ah, that's alright. Nothing wrong with it. All right. Everybody Randall hunt, VP of cloud strategy and solutions at Kaylin Randall. I really appreciate you joining the show. My name's John Meyer. I've been your host. Don't forget to hit that. Like subscribe and notify Randall before we close things out. Do you have anything else you'd like to add?

Guest: Randall

No, thank you so much for having me and it's, uh, it's great to be here and, uh, looking forward to hearing more of the episodes. Uh, oh, Hey Alexa, turn off the lights.

 

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