Ep#55 Are you NOT Entertained? with AWS Shweta Jain

March 30, 2022
EP55 Shweta Jain 1280

About the Guest

As APAC Head of Business Development for Media and Entertainment at AWS, Shweta is responsible for providing strategic guidance for AWS M&E industry vertical across Asia Pacific region. With 23 years of extensive work experience in leadership roles across media technology and new business initiatives, Shweta has a deep understanding of the challenges as well as the innovation which the industry thrives on, which in turn has helped her earn the trust of many media executives around the globe.

Episode Summary

In the past two years, the media and entertainment industry has evolved and sky rocketed towards a huge growth. Content is being consumed and created at a recorded pace when some thoughts that we might be stuck at home without fresh content to watch. Video sharing apps went from zero to billions of views during the pandemic. Find out how AWS has helped entertainment companies like Netflix get creative during the pandemic with over 600 digital effects to edit, while working remotely. Or how F1 racing is leading the pack not only on the track with media and entertainment but with user data and machine learning. What about broadcasting media and entertainment artist like K pop in their own native language.

Episode Show Notes & Transcript

Host: Jon

Are you not entertained in the past two years, the media and entertainment industry has skyrocketed content is being consumed and created at a record pace. Some thought that we wouldn't have fresh and new and exciting content to watch. But guess what? Video sharing apps went from zero to billions of views during the pandemic,

Host: Jon

Find out how AWS has helped entertainment companies like Netflix, get creative during the pandemic with over 600 digital effects that need to be edited remotely, or how F1 racing is leading the pack. Not only on the track with media and entertainment, but with user data and machine learning. What about broadcasting, media and entertainment artists like K-pop and how fans wanted broadcasted or translated in their own native language. Joining me today, head of business development for media and entertainment in the APAC region for AWS Sweeta Jane. Now, you know the drill before I bring Sweeta onto the show, don't forget to hit that like subscribe and notification because sweet is gonna be sharing some insights on how AWS is reducing the glass, the glass latency. Please join me in welcoming Sweeta to the show. Sweeta, thank you so much for joining

Guest: Shweta

Me. I'm very well, John, thanks for having me on your show. And I have to say I've watched a few of your episodes and I love the energy and the passion that you bring. So really looking forward to talking to you today.

Host: Jon

Thank you so much. I think my passion comes from my guest. My guests have inspiring stories to tell, and I just like bringing it out and sharing it with everybody. So when I click that record button based off our conversation, my energy level goes up.

Guest: Shweta

<laugh> nice. So I hope who match that. <laugh>

Host: Jon

Ah, don't worry. You know what I, little bit of sidebar. I had a recording yesterday and a buddy of mine said, you know what, after we're done with the call, somebody said, how come you don't have the same energy level as John? You know, it's hard to match my energy level sometimes. And I apologize, but I just can't change it.

Guest: Shweta

Sure.

Host: Jon

SOA, a little bit of backstory in yourself and how you come to media and entertainment and specifically this role as head of business development.

Guest: Shweta

Yeah, sure. Happy to share that. Uh, and uh, you know, it's been now 23 years in the industry and it just feels like yesterday and at the same time feels like a zillion years because the industry has changed so much. So I started my career, uh, as a software developer in one of the leading media entertainment companies in India. And, uh, there's been, you know, no looking back since then. Uh, I built teams, I've worked across broadcast and digital and, uh, went on to set up a new business, uh, in the digital space for my company. And that's how I became a customer of AWS. Uh, and January, 2018, I started with AWS as the India business development lead for media vertical. And then about a year into the role, I thought, okay, it's going well, why not? Uh, look at a wider region and you know, do increase the impact and, you know, increase my blast phase radi, so to speak. So, yeah, I moved to Singapore in 2019 and uh, started in this role and it's been so amazing, uh, getting to work with such a diverse set of customers and our fantastic teams in, um, countries across Asia. It's been amazing

Host: Jon

23 years. Wow. I've got a lot of questions to ask and pick your brain. I'm gonna have to do some on, off side because 23 years. And I am just getting into, and I say, what I do is like media and entertainment because podcasting con uh, content creating is media and entertainment, but you've got a lot of knowledge and you know what, let's talk about media and entertainment, and specifically the role of head of business development around M and E. What is that? And, you know, really what do you do? What are some of your goals?

Guest: Shweta

Yeah, happy to share that. Um, so first of all, I want to point out that media entertainment is a strategic industry, vertical for us at AWS, and a big area of focus. And, you know, we've been investing, um, specifically, I would say over the last five years or so, we've been investing heavily to build our portfolio of media services and AWS solutions developing our partner ecosystem. And of course there's so much that we can learn from our customers, you know, the media organizations in this region. So I want to, uh, you know, call out, uh, specifically the direct to consumer segment, you know, where we are seeing so much more, uh, consumption and therefore focus from our customers, right? And if you think about it, the consumers really expect to access their content anywhere, anytime, you know, on the device of their choice. Right? And in fact, mobile phone is the primary device for content consumption and therefore all our customers, they are focusing on direct to consumer in a big way, and have already either an OTT platform already in the market, or are in the process of building it.

Guest: Shweta

And, uh, my job as the business development leaders, really to support all these initiatives across the region, working closely with our field teams, you know, how we can help them expand their global footprint, how we can help them really monetize, uh, their content better, um, help them scale up. Like if you, uh, talk about APAC specifically, we have customers like Disney plus hot star that is managing scales of millions of, uh, you know, concurrent users during the, uh, cricket, uh, matches. And then in here in Southeast Asia, we've got Astro Malaysia, the leading, uh, entertainment company of Southeast Asia. And they have been, you know, innovating so much launching new kind of experiences on sector boxes, launching new OTT platforms, uh, which they did in fact, uh, last year ska, um, that is also built on AWS there's Fox sports in Australia that launch K sports there's Foxtel that launched binge.

Guest: Shweta

I mean, so many, uh, interesting, you know, customers and so much to learn from our customers. And, uh, really the videos of focus for us has been of course, driven by what our customers are focusing on. Right. So direct to, to consumer is one of them, and there's also content production, right? And there's been, uh, so much innovation in that space as the production studios and the, uh, uh, I would say the rendering and the visual effects companies have been focusing on building platforms, host, uh, based on cloud, how they can enable access to the editing tools, uh, you know, for their editor and artists who may be working from anywhere in the world. So, so as we go, uh, in this, you know, conversation happy to share with you some of the examples, but, uh, yeah, these are, uh, some of the things I would say just like two or three of the major focus areas for us in the region, and I'm totally loving it. I'm very passionate about, uh, this industry. And, uh, we have such a fantastic team, you know, across the region that I, I simply love working in this area.

Host: Jon

I can tell your passion and how you're coming out and all the information and how media has evolved. Speaking of how it's evolved. I'm gonna assume in the last two years during this pandemic, how has it really evolved? Because for me personally, I bet you, in the first six to like 12 months media went through the roof, I mean, the, you know, consuming of media entertainment, the creation of media, the creation of content has, I'm gonna, if I said triple that's probably like on the lowest scale possible, how has it evolved during this pandemic?

Guest: Shweta

Yeah, absolutely. Uh, like you said, you know, as people were spending more time in those, the OTD platform saw such massive increase in the content consumption, right. It really went through the roof and, uh, Netflix is such a great story there. You know, they even talked about how they have been leveraging AWS auto scaling to meet that unprecedented demand globally. Right. And if you talk about here in APAC in India, we have a customer times group, they launched a video sharing app called Karta in the middle of the pandemic, which went from zero to 1 billion daily video views within the first month of launch. Wow. So that's the, uh, scale we are talking about. And if you look at, uh, other areas, you know, beyond OTT, the work from home situation arising out of this, uh, pandemic, uh, really accelerated the transformation of content production and broadcast workflows, uh, you know, a lot of our customers, they had already, uh, started that journey, but I think, uh, the whole situation kind of pushed it forward by, um, many, many months, if not, he has right.

Guest: Shweta

Unsafe naught years. Right? So, uh, when the whole situation interrupted the film and television pro production in back in 2020, we heard some predictions in the industry that, oh, we may find ourselves stuck at home with nothing new to watch. No fresh content is going to come in, but guess what? The studios, the entertainment, uh, companies, you know, they, they made sure that that entertainment void never really happened because they got really creative and they turned to the cloud and they worked closely with us. Um, so many of them, um, let me pick the example. Once again, of Netflix, you know, they're very popular series. The crown, um, their, uh, a new season was coming, which was season four. And, uh, their teams were spread, uh, across the globe. And, uh, they had, uh, a very tough task of finishing, I think about 600 visual effects shots for that new season.

Guest: Shweta

So they were all working remotely and they leveraged the cloud infrastructure of AWS to put that all together. And we saw how great, uh, that new season was. In fact, we published, uh, full case study with Netflix that how they're building this, they have already built, sorry. Uh, the visual effects studio in the cloud to attract top talent, you know, across artists, editors, top talent across the world who now have the ability to work from anywhere in the world and collaborate for projects and some doing some really advanced visual effects rendering. So that's on the content production. And, uh, then on the broadcast side, also, we saw a lot of, uh, traditional broadcasters looking to cloud for their play and distribution workloads, uh, so that their teams can operate from home. And at the same time, there were opportunities to be had right in the market because the content consumption was going up so much.

Guest: Shweta

So the ability to respond to those new opportunities in the market, uh, run some experiment, see if it works, if it doesn't work, just shut it down. So basically that whole agility aspect of it, we saw in its true, uh, color, you know, the, the true value proposition of the cloud is really that the pay as you go model, and then the ability to be experimenting at really low cost and, uh, be agile. So, so in a way, yes, uh, the pandemic did have an impact, uh, on, you know, the industry. And some of these changes, if I may just call it out, some of these changes were posed, you know, for some of the companies, especially the large enterprises, but they've seen the benefits and we believe that this is a change that's going to stick. So this is the new normal that they have adopted to.

Host: Jon

I think the pandemic has brought upon an expedited change in using technology. Uh, the work from home aspect was highly against, of older enterprise companies, but during the pandemic of allowing them to work from home, they realized that people were getting more done and you have that work life harmony, and you, you were talking about broadcasting and I wanna jump over to really live streaming platforms, especially my favorite sports. And, you know, there, there's a huge task to ensure that hundreds of millions of their audience around the globe have seamlessly viewing experience. And based on your experience of working closely with a company called hot star in India, what are some of the ways AWS supported them in their endeavors?

Guest: Shweta

Oh yeah. Uh, when it comes to cricket, you can expect all sorts of world regards to be broken. And, uh, you know, the live streaming is of course, uh, one of them and very, very, uh, critical areas for us to focus on because our customers, uh, really see the value in, you know, uh, enhancing that experience for the viewers, because the viewers are really flocking to these platforms. And, uh, to give you an example, uh, some idea about the scale I want to share with you that hot star, in fact, broke its own record for live streaming. Uh, back in 2019 during the world cup semifinal match, when India was playing New Zealand and they had 25 million concurrent users for that match, right. So being able to scale, um, and, and then be also able to keep an eye on the cost, you know, not just the quality of the streaming, but also keeping an eye on the cost.

Guest: Shweta

So there are multiple areas, uh, where we are working very closely with hot star. And one of the areas is really how do we work together to minimize the glass to glass latency? Right? So from the glass of the camera, in the stadium to the glass of the mobile phone of the end user. So in back in 2019, uh, hot star team worked very closely with AWS elemented teams to move their video pipelines to the cloud using elemental media services. And they were able to cut down that latency by over 60%, right. Which is such a huge, um, I would say, um, you know, a very significant, uh, significant for, uh, the company as a business outcome, because you don't want viewers to be tweeting about a fixed, uh, before, you know, you see it on hard, start on your mobile phone. So, so that is one area, you know, how do we optimize the video pipelines and reduce the latencies, increase the quality of this streaming, another area like i'veed the kind of scale they're operating on.

Guest: Shweta

It's super critical to keep an eye on the cost. And that's where they are leveraging AWS part instances to run some of their workloads, uh, like machine learning and data science workloads, and also some workloads which they have developed to, uh, generate that load to simulate LiveLike situations and, you know, high traffic patterns. So AWS, uh, sport instances, uh, is something which is very core to their, uh, uh, the entire solution that they've built. And, uh, it has helped them save anywhere between 70 to 80% on their overall cost, uh, for compute requirements for some of these workloads,

Host: Jon

Glass to glass latency. That is the first time I've heard that term, but I can visually see when you mentioned the glass of the camera to the glass of my phone, the latency for that, how many times have you go on on, and you're watching a show, right. And you have tweets turned on and all of a sudden your phone lights up and you're like, oh, okay. You look at it. And darn it had just ruined the ending or the outcome of the game. And you didn't even get there yet.

Guest: Shweta

Exactly. Super critical. I mean, the fans are so demanding these days, and I think, uh, they are really driving the narrative for the industry.

Host: Jon

So staying on topic of sports just a little bit, you mentioned IM L and I wanna talk about F1 because I know F1 plays a huge part in IML, deep race or AWS. What about the use of a ML and how has it enhanced the performance of players?

Guest: Shweta

Yeah. Uh, happy to share that, uh, John and, uh, the formula one of course is one organization, which is leading the pack right there, you know, uh, use of data machine learning to enhance the pan engagement. And, uh, one of the things that I want to, uh, highlight is the fact that in formula one races, uh, one critical aspect to remember is that the viewers get to see very small part of the actual racing track. Um, you know, that's visible in a, uh, in a frame then, which is why data analytics and all those interesting graphics, they become super critical, you know, to get, uh, that experience of the edge of the seat experience for the fans. Right? So that's formula one, of course, and that's fan engagement. And like you mentioned, uh, data and machine learning, uh, data analytics and machine learning can also play a part in enhancing the performance of the players.

Guest: Shweta

Right? So there, I want share a story that I'm, um, extremely proud of, uh, that AWS got a chance, you know, a huge privilege to collaborate with the fantastic swim team of Australia, uh, who won a total of nine gold medals at the Tokyo Olympics last year. And it was their best of ever performance at the Olympics. Um, and I, I want to also say that, uh, the athletes are, and will always be central to the sport, but if we can gain a deeper knowledge and understanding of the player's performance by leveraging data analytics and machine learning, uh, I, I really believe that yes, it can help, uh, teams uncover even more potential. So two years before landing in Tokyo, the swimming Australia team had entered into a partnership with AWS to try and gain a competitive advantage, you know, um, by harnessing the power of data more effectively.

Guest: Shweta

So at that time they had a lot of systems that were collecting different types of data, um, in different type of systems working mostly in silos. So by bringing all this data together into a central data lake on AWS, and by applying, uh, machine learning, uh, they were able to, uh, work together with our machine learning labs team to develop a solution that pulled all the performance data, you know, uh, together and apply machine learning models to predict the pro uh, the probable, uh, combinations for team Australia and not just for their own team, but they also try to predict the scores that are likely to be deployed by the rival teams, you know, and all this data, uh, gave the coaches some direction and allowed them to make more evidence based decisions, uh, data driven decisions, right. And the outcome of all that effort was everyone to see how the team, uh, won so many goals at the, uh, Olympics. And we are so proud to have played a very small part, um, you know, as partners with them on this journey.

Host: Jon

When I think of IML and I think of swimming until you mentioned it, I didn't understand how it would come together. I mean, here I have a person, right. And their swimming ability for me is fluctuated, right? So that you never know how well they're gonna swim, but what other data would be collected. I mean, I'm gonna, I'm gonna assume that this person performs at, you know, the X level, and they're gonna finish in this amount of speed. I should be really across the line or by the halfway point, by this time, if I'm not, or does it like the number of strokes come into play? I, I really would love to understand what data is captured and how they kind of use that to their advantage. I mean, the data's there. It's not like they did anything extra, they just analyzed it. They had AWS come in and say, listen, we just want to gain a little bit of a competitive advantage analyzing what's already available to us.

Guest: Shweta

Yes, absolutely. And I would love, uh, to, you know, showcase that video that we made together with them that talks more about, um, you know, how really they leveraged the data and, uh, what were some of the key, um, uh, I would say performance, uh, related, uh, points that they were looking for, you know, as they developed these custom models to analyze all that data. So, yeah, I would love you to, uh, play that clip, uh, if possible for our customers, uh, sorry for our viewers, uh, or just drop a link in the chat. It'll be great. Thank you.

Speaker 3:

Swimming in Australia is, is the most successful Olympic sport Australia in an Olympic term is the second best nation that's ever been behind the USA. A

Speaker 4:

We're really lucky in Australia that the Australian sporting system, right back from 1982, the government funded the Australian Institute of sport. That was where sports science in Australia was really born. And so Australia in sport in general has always been at the forefront of science.

Speaker 4:

I guess the ultimate piece of analysis that we look at is always the race. That's the basis of where the evidence starts is what's actually done in the competition pool and using that race analysis to analyze the performance, physiological testing will give you evidence, whether it be love lactates or gas analysis, or, um, sleep monitoring, evidence on how the athlete is responding to training programs that the coaches are using. So it's about pulling that training evidence and combining it with the race analysis and looking for opportunities to improve certain parts of the race. And then how you might do that in training

Host: Jon

I'm captivated by the data on how this is being analyzed. And I could probably go off and a tangent just a little bit, but I'm gonna bring us everybody back. So listeners, I wanna jump right back into a little bit more specifically, uh, the media entertainment and broadcasting. We has shared some, uh, you know, F1. We talked about swimming in Australia, but LA let's talk about, you know, cloud is the default platform for most, if not all O T T players, what about traditional broadcasters? Are they starting to look at public cloud to run their core workloads? Uh, and then we, we can talk more about COVID in the pandemic and how they accelerated to transition, but let's jump into it.

Guest: Shweta

Yeah. Uh, well, if you asked me this question two years ago, my answer would've been quite different, uh, to your point, you know, the impact of the pandemic. Um, so today we have over 2,900 channels, uh, originating on AWS. And this number was roughly half in 2019, but thanks to our highly enterprising partners, such as Margi <inaudible> grass valley imagine. And, uh, so many others. Uh, so the broadcast play out and distribution on AWS today is a very mature offering. And we have customers like discovery who have hundreds of channels, including their APAC channel feeds that are originating on AWS. Uh, we recently worked with another customer EBS CBN in Philippines to move, uh, channel play layout and distribution for their 20 channels to AWS. So many such customers, you know, who were, uh, perhaps still on the fence, uh, on the idea of running their mission, critical broadcasting workloads on a public cloud infrastructure.

Guest: Shweta

Uh, they decided to move forward with their plans. And, uh, the, the agility that I, you know, alluded to before, uh, the agility, the flexibility that the cloud brings to broadcast it is so significant for the business. For example, it's become so easy and inexpensive for sports rights holders to quickly set up new channels, uh, seasonal channels. What we also refer to as popup channels, you know, for a short period of time, as an example, I can, uh, share with you the seven best media in Australia. They used, uh, what we call the channel assembly feature of one of our services, elemental media tailor to launch new popup channels, seasonal channels only during the Tokyo Olympics games last year, and these kind of experiments, you know, they, they can help broadcasters to derive more value from the existing content libraries in ways that perhaps they could not do, uh, any, you know, um, originally with their, uh, on-prem setups.

Guest: Shweta

And, and also, like I said earlier at a fraction of the price, because these are pay as you go models, right? So it opens up newer monetization opportunities for them and helps them to expand their, you know, to test new markets, new kind of niche customer segments. So, so yeah, I mean, to your point, broadcasting yes, two years ago, perhaps it was still, um, and, uh, uh, you know, an area where we were seeing some interest, uh, but not a lot of decision making, but things have changed drastically in the last two years. And we are so excited to see that change happening.

Host: Jon

You're talking about change happening. And I thought of another question here for IML. What about content localization specifically around the use of IML for multilingual subtitles, transcriptions translation? I mean, really there's so much there has this really been expedited with the use of AWS IML with media and entertainment?

Guest: Shweta

Yeah, absolutely. And, uh, content localization is super critical, you know, not, not just for APAC, but the, um, all the content platforms across the globe, but it's almost like a necessity here in APAC, because as far some industry reports, 90% of all video consumption that happens across television and digital platforms here in APAC is local language content. Right. And therefore the content platforms, like you mentioned, multilingual subtitles, you know, that's one way of reaching out to more audiences for their content, right. And, um, one customer story, uh, that it's very close to my heart, uh, uh, because also because I have a Kpop phone fan at home as well, is our chore based customer S so they run this Kpop fan engagement platform and they use Amazon translate, uh, to translate the messages on the go, uh, between, you know, millions of fans, uh, spread across the globe who are wanting to interact with banks like BTS and other Kpop artists in their preferred language, right. It's such a beautiful story of AI enabling that human connection. Um, and I, I really think that, uh, this is just the start. And of course, I mean, the AI services are still maturing and especially, you know, as we add new languages, it takes time for them to become really production. Uh, so we are working very with our customers in the region to improve all that

Host: Jon

Content localization, something I saw. And I, it was probably a tweet or something. And by the CTO Warner Vogul and how, uh, for football, the stadium or the, the, the advertisement that's behind or with the players, right. That's on the screen is actually localized to wherever you're viewing it. So if you're, you know, in this region and it's a local, like, uh, beverage company that might be there, or you're in another one that mean like another sports thing or something. And I, I find that, uh, really cool how they do it. And sometimes they insert that during the game, it's like the players run through it and they don't realize that it's not even real. Like this is the localized, like advertisement for media entertainment. And I, I thought it was cool how we've come a long way from doing that from just having slides behind it or something that's static that you have to change. It's actually a waste to constantly change those things.

Guest: Shweta

Yeah, absolutely. And, uh, you talked about advertising, right? So targeted advertising is, is super critical in this part of the works, uh, specifically because the propensity to pay for content in many Asian markets, it's pretty low as compared to the us or, uh, Europe, right? So here, the content platforms depend a lot on advertising for their revenues. And therefore if they can leverage AI machine learning to increase their ad monetization and to drive better return on investment for their advertisers and therefore, you know, command better CPM rates for their ad inventory. Uh, so, uh, a great example I can share with you there is how the OTT platform of Z entertainment in India, Z five, they use our server side ad insertion service called elemental media to stitch the ads within the content, right? So it becomes more targeted. It becomes personalized. There are a, uh, you know, a variety of factors that you can use to personalize or, um, you know, make it more targeted based on, um, either the user profile or even the content that you're watching.

Guest: Shweta

You know, like if I'm watching a football match, um, I may, uh, like to see, um, you know, a Nike shoe ad, right? That's more targeted, uh, at me as a, as a sports viewer. But if I'm on my food channel, a new pasta sauce that just became available in the supermarket, in the neighborhood, it makes more sense to watch that ad, right. I'm less likely to skip that advertisement. So, so this way the OTT platforms are able to augment their a monetization, which can really command better CPM rates. Like I said earlier. So Z five, um, I mentioned they, they are today delivering over 100 million targeted advertisements on their 18 plus live channels on their digital platforms,

Host: Jon

Targeted ads, content related ads. What about interactive ads? Because I've got my fire stick, I watch a couple of shows. And then all of a sudden it says, you can watch the regular ad, or you can interact with this content and minimize your ad time. What about interactive ads? I know they're becoming really big and popular. How well are they being used? And what are you seeing on your end that people are actually interacting with them to go through it because you, you, it feels like we have to keep those watching engaged the moment it hits ads, everybody gets their phone and they're like this, and then they're missing the content that's on the screen.

Guest: Shweta

Yeah, absolutely. And, uh, you know, you talked about keeping the viewers engaged and inter activities. Definitely one of the big, um, ideas of focus for us at AWS, because the customers are seeing the value in doing that. In fact, uh, many of our customers, uh, Kai came to us and asked us, you know, can we create a Twitch, like experience, you know, which is interactive, low latency live streaming. So we have this service called Amazon IVs that can help the customers create that what we call the lean forward experience. You know? So like in a lean back experience, you are just consuming the content and there is no interaction. I mean, it is, it is great for maybe long form content like movies. But if you are, uh, looking at, uh, short form content, or if, if you, if you're looking at something that's more like a community experience.

Guest: Shweta

Like I see my daughter, my 14 year old daughter, when she's playing, um, games, she's also watching online streams of other gamers, you know, how they are playing, uh, learning from them and even, you know, popping a question or two and how to get that, uh, or how to, you know, achieve and achieve the next milestone. So it's, it's so interesting the young generations, especially, you know, they really want to interact and advertisements is part of it, right? So, uh, so like I, going back to the Twitch, uh, experience, what we did is we launched this service called Amazon interactive video service, which is, uh, fully managed service live streaming solution, uh, low latency live streaming solution from AWS, uh, that uses exactly the same technology that powers switch. So the service does everything that you need to make low latency live video available to any viewer around the globe.

Guest: Shweta

And Amazon IVs will handle the content ingestion, transing packaging and final delivery of your life content. So our customers can just focus on the content and monetization aspects of it. Um, so to talk about interactive advertising, uh, if you are having advertisements as stitched as part of your content, you can actually have links to buy that product, you know, uh, on a, on your retail website. So amazon.com/live is in fact, a great example. Uh, they are leveraging IBS to stream, um, uh, to let people stream themselves. And like, if I'm reviewing a makeup product, for example, you know, I'm putting on eyeshadow, uh, the viewers can actually click on the link, uh, there to buy that particular brand, you know, that I'm using. So that's just one of the many, many use cases that we are seeing in the interactive live video streaming space.

Host: Jon

When Amazon, uh, IVs came out, I was huge. I was like, oh my God, I'm a Twitch streamer. I was doing it for AWS deep racer. I, I love the low latency aspect. I was thinking, okay, how can we take this, integrate it and stream out all the knockout rounds and then the live streaming race you mentioned, uh, Amazon live. Are you telling me that I could go on there myself and start talking about the various products for it? Uh, oh my God. I like being on like doing this and talk. I wanna talk to the audience and be like, listen, you gotta check out this cool pen and take, Amazon has built some awesome technology on top of AWS, everything that you're talking about, media entertainment, the F1, the swimming, how it has helped expedite everything through this last two years, the case studies is really inspiring and, you know, media and entertainment is really close to my, he being what I do and the energy that I tried to bring. I hope you enjoyed my energy for this show.

Guest: Shweta

I did

Host: Jon

Awesome.

Guest: Shweta

I did. And, and you know what, John, I mean, if I may add what you just mentioned, you know, how Amazon has been innovating on behalf of the customers and our customers, customers, you know, and, and one aspect of it is the whole democratization of technology. You know, the ease of access to cutting its solutions that has made been, you know, that has been made possible by the use of cloud to build all those real engaging content experiences, even doing live production. I mean, that's another topic, uh, that we can have another one hour conversation. Wait, wait,

Host: Jon

Wait, wait, are you saying, are you saying we're gonna sign up for another recording and talk about live production? All right. Sold I'll sign you up.

Guest: Shweta

Would love to, we'd love to definitely like sports of course, is a, you know, close to everyone's heart. And, uh, we are doing some really interesting work there in the areas of remote life production and just enhancing the fan engagement. I mean, we did touch upon it today, but there's a lot more to, it would love to get, uh, you know, uh, dive deep, deep into it at some point with you

Host: Jon

Dive deep Amazons leadership principles coming out. Don't worry. I'm an ex Amazonian. It's the principles lied, uh, really close to me and I still use them today. I would love to dive deep in another future. One folks, head of business development for media and entertainment, APAC region. Sweet Jane sweeter. Thank you so much for joining me.

Guest: Shweta

Thank you for having me still day one. Very excited to think about all the innovation that yet to come. So thanks so much, John, for the opportunity.

Host: Jon

I'm glad you could join me. Okay, folks. Thanks for joining the John Meyer podcast. Don't forget to hit that, like subscribe and notify, because guess what? We're outta here.

 

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